Cabin fever – things

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This post finishes the ‘Cabin fever’ series of macro shots that I’ve been taking recently in a vain attempt to avoid the cold outside (it snowed Saturday, again) and yet keep up with my photography. It may be difficult to distinguish what some of these objects are, so I have placed a legend at the end so that you can guess what they are as you look through them.

Before viewing the photographs, I would also like to invite you to visit the poetry blog, the Book of Pain. As always, special thanks to my dearest spouse Lyn, who does most of the hard part: the photos selection. Thank you for dropping by the Book of Bokeh.

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Legend:

1) Post’s featured image: drinking straws, seen on end
2) Giant sequoia tree cone
3) Water droplets under a plastic cover
4) match stick heads
5) glass beads (no illumination)
6) strike zone of match box
7) bottom of LED bulb
8) glass beads (illuminated by ring flash)
9) matches
10) plastic drinking straws
11) bulb stem
12) strike zone of match box
13) wood screws
14) match barrels

 

All photographs and comments ©John Etheridge with all rights reserved; not to be used without the expressed written permission of the copyright owner.

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49 thoughts on “Cabin fever – things

  1. great idea! i’ve done that myself. you pull it off really well. sometimes people make photos sort of like these and everyone asks, what is it? what is it? imo, it really doesn’t matter what it is!

    i love patterns and repetition, so these work really well for me!

    great work!

    • Thank you so much! I had a lot of fun taking these and getting them set up…it was a good experiment. I learned a lot! 🙂 And that’s never a bad thing!

  2. Lovely work! I appreciate not only the fine macro photos, but the perspectives you’ve chosen: the straws on end, the base of the light bulb as well as the stem, the match heads and, later, bodies. Your pictures highlight wonderfully the beauty of ordinary things. Thank you.

    • That is a very kind and gracious thing to say! And I appreciate your dropping by the Book of Bokeh. Please do come again…and if you are going to say such nice things…please drop by often! 🙂

  3. Seriously: Wow. The first image, the straws … beautiful colors and the theme of beginning (something) and not knowing what is on the other end (until I read the legend). Raindrops: an accentuation of the unfathomable beauty & wonder of creation, Creator. So good, Man. T

    • Oh, thank you! In fact, that particular shot was quite by accident. I had gone into the kitchen to get the straws when I noticed that the ‘starter’ I had mixed the previous evening for making bread later that day had developed all these water droplets underneath the plastic. “That’s cool!” I thought and grabbed it too. Getting it down into the basement without knocking all the water droplets off was no easy task! But worth it. 🙂

        • Oh yes, and the bread was delicious! I am not, you know, just another pretty faced, strong, intelligent, witty, brilliant photographer. I bake bread, cook meals and do the laundry (sometimes), I’ll have you know. But I am not allowed near a paint brush and my taste in all things decorative is wisely ignored. In fact, I can do WHATEVER I WANT if Lyn allows me, WHENEVER I WANT, if it’s ok with her. I am THE MAN of my home!!

            • I bake on a stone and I spray each loaf with water before they go in the oven to harden the crust. I also use only flour, water, salt and a biga, typically like the French…no eggs or oils that make it Italian-ish. I like a creamy dry center but hard crust. (It goes stale faster but then it just makes better toast! 🙂 ) I don’t use the pan of boiling water because I cook with gas and that is moisture enough. But if I was cooking in an electric oven I would for sure. Moisture is very important. In fact, did you know that croissant bakeries have spray nozzles in the oven and spray off and on while the baking is being done? That’s what helps croissants be so flaky.

              • I’m like you, a bread should be crispy outside and soft inside. I really love fresh bread crusts 🙂 I have a recipe with 1/3 of water and 2/3 of milk. Instead of 100% water. What are your thoughts about that ? You think it’s better with only water ?

                I didn’t know about croissants (but I’m not a big fan, which would explain my lack of interest :D)

                • Me, personally, I do water, water, water and only water. If you use a whole milk, that is adding fat and that, to me, makes the crust softer like Italian breads. If you used a skim milk, than that may only affect the taste, I am not sure. You could also use a skim milk yogurt or buttermilk (not sure of buttermilk is purely American or not…think of a sour milk, thinner than yogurt but a bit thicker than milk) instead of the milk that will give your bread a sourdough taste that to me is perfection in bread. For my recipes I always start some yeast in flour and water the night before…this gives it a chance to mature and also bring in a sourdough like taste.

                  Don’t like croissants?!?!? Isn’t that grounds for citizenship rejection in the EU?

                  • Hmm I see, so water, water and only water, I will try to remember that, it doesn’t sound too difficult 😉

                    We have similar product, but it’s not called buttermilk, but I know what you mean. I had delicious sour bread in San Francisco 🙂

                    I don’t like croissant because it’s greasy. Yuk. I’m always very ashamed when we go to b&b, they often propose that but I can’t eat it. I just can’t. It would be worse if I was French I supposed 😉

                    • I get it, you must live on the Flemish side. No croissants, but I bet you like sauerkraut!

                    • You don’t like sauerkraut too? OMG! Next you’ll be saying that you have become a fan of American football over European football! 🙂

                      I think Belgium one of the neatest and most beautiful spots on Earth, and such a close mixture of so many wonderful influences capped with a uniqueness all its own. And to be there right now, when the Cycling Spring Classics are ongoing would be heaven! That and the croissants, sauerkraut and sausages, of course, too…although not all at the same time. 🙂

                    • I thought about you actually when I heard about the Cycling spring Classics 😉 Are watching them on tv ?

                      Actually, I love Sauerkraut 😉 But I’ve never thought about it as a Belgian specialty 😉 For me, i associated it with Alsace (in East of France) or Germany 😉

                    • This will be long but it’s a great story. I was living in Rwanda and learning to speak French. In Quebec, measurements are given much as in English, ‘one fourth of a kilo’ is common. So, one day I ordered ‘un quatrième kilo de la choucroute.’ The server looked at me with that, ‘You’re kidding’ look and asked, “Bien sur?” I said of course and he went off. It took about fifteen minutes and he finally came back with a mountain of sauerkraut in his arms! My accent was wrong or I said it wrong but he thought I wanted 4 kilos of sauerkraut! I was very, very careful after that to always order ‘deux cent grams’ portions!

                      For some odd reason that I cannot explain, I have always associated sauerkraut with the Dutch. Don’t ask me why and I know it’s silly, but there you are, tulips and sauerkraut, they are perfectly matched in my world.

                      By the way, I am starting my Monochrome challenge today. 🙂

                    • Now I can laugh about it too. Until I remember what 4 kilos of choucroute smells like, then I cringe. 🙂 But yes, please, tell the story wherever you can!

        • Well, in fact, I have already put off one challenge until I had more time and I’ll never have more time, so I will try and do it. But I may not pass the challenge along (what I will do is write to people first and ask them if they mind being challenged) and I will need a week or two to get ready. How’s that?! 🙂

          • Don’t worry, I won’t mind if you don’t do it or do it in a few weeks, but I think it could be interesting to see what you can offer :p

            Or what you can do is 5 pictures in one go if it’s easier, it could also be an option (less time consuming) 🙂

            • Thank you for that confidence! I think (I hope) that I am going to start on Friday. I am enjoying yours immensely! 🙂

    • Actually it’s going to be lovely and warm this weekend! 🙂 🙂 And rain for three days straight! 😦 😦

      Ah well, good thing macros are fun to do! 🙂

    • Thank you! That was a lot of fun. In fact, after a couple of requests, I may just do a Can You Guess What This Is? game. We’ll see…

    • Thank you Matt! It was a lot of fun, actually. Since this weekend is a bust I may accede to some requests and do a Can You Guess What This Is? challenge. That ought to be fun! Glad to see that you’re back. All rested up, yet?

    • And I for you. Happily, there is to be no snow this weekend!!!! 🙂

      Just three days of rain. 😦

      C’est la vie…

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